The Artistic Endeavor
victoriousvocabulary:

SACHAMAMA [aka SACH’AMAMA]
[noun]
Incan Mythology: a two-headed serpent considered to be the mother of forests and tree of life.
Etymology: Quechuan, “mother of the earth”, “Mother Tree” or “Mother Jungle”.
[Jessica Perlstein - The Rise of Sachamama]

victoriousvocabulary:

SACHAMAMA [aka SACH’AMAMA]

[noun]

Incan Mythology: a two-headed serpent considered to be the mother of forests and tree of life.

Etymology: Quechuan, “mother of the earth”, “Mother Tree” or “Mother Jungle”.

[Jessica Perlstein - The Rise of Sachamama]

victoriousvocabulary:

VED’MA
[noun]
1. a witch; a woman claiming or popularly believed to possess magical powers and practice sorcery.
2. a woman considered to be spiteful or overbearing.
3. Informal: a woman or girl considered bewitching.
4. one particularly skilled or competent at one’s craft.
Etymology: Russian, ведьма, literally “the one who knows”, from Old Slavic вѣдъ “to know”.
[Arantzazu Martinez]

victoriousvocabulary:

VED’MA

[noun]

1. a witch; a woman claiming or popularly believed to possess magical powers and practice sorcery.

2. a woman considered to be spiteful or overbearing.

3. Informal: a woman or girl considered bewitching.

4. one particularly skilled or competent at one’s craft.

Etymology: Russian, ведьма, literally “the one who knows”, from Old Slavic вѣдъ “to know”.

[Arantzazu Martinez]

victoriousvocabulary:

AULIC
[adjective]
1. courtly; ceremonious; genteel.
2. relating to a royal court.
Etymology: from Latin aulicus, from Greek aulikos - belonging to a prince’s court, from aulē - court.
[Kinuko Y. Craft]

victoriousvocabulary:

AULIC

[adjective]

1. courtly; ceremonious; genteel.

2. relating to a royal court.

Etymology: from Latin aulicus, from Greek aulikos - belonging to a prince’s court, from aulē - court.

[Kinuko Y. Craft]

From Les Misérables - The Musical Phenomenon - The Artistry Behind the Film

Lana Del Rey by Jack Gregory

Lana Del Rey by Jack Gregory

digitalmeatloaf:

Have you checked out the Meatloaf? http://digitalmeatloaf.tumblr.com

digitalmeatloaf:

Have you checked out the Meatloaf? http://digitalmeatloaf.tumblr.com

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Emily Greene Balch, Nobel Laureate (1961)
There is a very good chance you’ve never heard of Emily Greene Balch. But in her time, the work Ms. Balch did would earn her the Nobel Peace Prize - only the third woman so honored.
Growing up in a wealthy family in Boston, she was encouraged to further herself with education and was a member of Bryn Mawr College’s first graduating class in 1889. She would then do further study in social work, with the legendary social reformer Jacob Riis. Then off to Paris to study political economy. She would also take courses at the University of Chicago and teach economics at the University of Berlin. In 1896, upon returning to the United States, she was named professor of economics at Wellesley College.
The outbreak of World War I in 1914 changed Ms. Balch’s career path forever. She became deeply involved in the peace movement, traveling to The Hague in 1915 for the International Congress for Women. Many of the proposals for peace agreed upon at the Congress were incorporated into President Woodrow Wilson’s 14-Point Plan.
Following the Women’s Congress she, along with another future peace prize winner, Jane Addams, and other prominent women activists founded the Women’s International Committee for Permanent Peace (later re-named Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, or WILPF).
She spent months trying to keep the United States out of the war, but was unable to prevent her country’s entry in 1917. Her peace activism was considered embarrassing to Wellesley so she took a leave of absence from the college. However after the war ended, her contract was not renewed.
She joined The Nation on the editorial staff and served as the secretary-treasurer of the WILPF. During this period she helped to organize and attend myriad peace conferences and was in constant contact with the short-lived League of Nations.
Several years later, in 1930, she was appointed by President Herbert Hoover to a committee assigned to travel and document conditions in U.S.-occupied Haiti. She was the author of the final report and its findings along with her lectures were influential in the decision to remove U.S. troops from the country.
Note: The United States landed 330 Marines in Port-au-Prince in July 1915 under the orders of President Woodrow Wilson in order to protect American “corporate interests.” Withdrawal was underway in 1932 but not completed until August 1934 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
When World War II broke out, Ms. Balch’s pacifist beliefs - which were not solely political but also theological as was evidence by her conversion to Quakerism in 1921 - came under attack. But not from outsiders, from herself. The violent military aggression of Germany and Japan challenged Ms. Balch’s total commitment to non-violence, and she was quoted as saying that it was vital to defend “fundamental human rights, sword in hand.” During the war she focused her efforts on caring for the victims of atrocities.
In 1946 she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, which she shared with John Mott, the YMCA president who worked with Christian student organizations to promote peace. During the presentation of the $34,000 award (about $400,000 in 2013 dollars), it was said about Ms. Balch by a professor at Columbia University, “I have never met anyone who has, as she has done, for decade after decade given every minute of her life to the work for peace between nations.” Ms. Balch donated her $17,000 share to the WILPF.
Emily Greene Balch died on January 9, 1961 at the age of 94. 
Sources: nobelprize.org, NY Times (original 1961 obituary), and Wikipedia
(Image of Emily Green Balch, taken between 1915 and 1925, is courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-hec-18336, and part of the Harris & Ewing Collection, given to the LOC in 1955.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Emily Greene Balch, Nobel Laureate (1961)

There is a very good chance you’ve never heard of Emily Greene Balch. But in her time, the work Ms. Balch did would earn her the Nobel Peace Prize - only the third woman so honored.

Growing up in a wealthy family in Boston, she was encouraged to further herself with education and was a member of Bryn Mawr College’s first graduating class in 1889. She would then do further study in social work, with the legendary social reformer Jacob Riis. Then off to Paris to study political economy. She would also take courses at the University of Chicago and teach economics at the University of Berlin. In 1896, upon returning to the United States, she was named professor of economics at Wellesley College.

The outbreak of World War I in 1914 changed Ms. Balch’s career path forever. She became deeply involved in the peace movement, traveling to The Hague in 1915 for the International Congress for Women. Many of the proposals for peace agreed upon at the Congress were incorporated into President Woodrow Wilson’s 14-Point Plan.

Following the Women’s Congress she, along with another future peace prize winner, Jane Addams, and other prominent women activists founded the Women’s International Committee for Permanent Peace (later re-named Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, or WILPF).

She spent months trying to keep the United States out of the war, but was unable to prevent her country’s entry in 1917. Her peace activism was considered embarrassing to Wellesley so she took a leave of absence from the college. However after the war ended, her contract was not renewed.

She joined The Nation on the editorial staff and served as the secretary-treasurer of the WILPF. During this period she helped to organize and attend myriad peace conferences and was in constant contact with the short-lived League of Nations.

Several years later, in 1930, she was appointed by President Herbert Hoover to a committee assigned to travel and document conditions in U.S.-occupied Haiti. She was the author of the final report and its findings along with her lectures were influential in the decision to remove U.S. troops from the country.

Note: The United States landed 330 Marines in Port-au-Prince in July 1915 under the orders of President Woodrow Wilson in order to protect American “corporate interests.” Withdrawal was underway in 1932 but not completed until August 1934 under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

When World War II broke out, Ms. Balch’s pacifist beliefs - which were not solely political but also theological as was evidence by her conversion to Quakerism in 1921 - came under attack. But not from outsiders, from herself. The violent military aggression of Germany and Japan challenged Ms. Balch’s total commitment to non-violence, and she was quoted as saying that it was vital to defend “fundamental human rights, sword in hand.” During the war she focused her efforts on caring for the victims of atrocities.

In 1946 she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, which she shared with John Mott, the YMCA president who worked with Christian student organizations to promote peace. During the presentation of the $34,000 award (about $400,000 in 2013 dollars), it was said about Ms. Balch by a professor at Columbia University, “I have never met anyone who has, as she has done, for decade after decade given every minute of her life to the work for peace between nations.” Ms. Balch donated her $17,000 share to the WILPF.

Emily Greene Balch died on January 9, 1961 at the age of 94. 

Sources: nobelprize.org, NY Times (original 1961 obituary), and Wikipedia

(Image of Emily Green Balch, taken between 1915 and 1925, is courtesy of the Library of Congress, LC-DIG-hec-18336, and part of the Harris & Ewing Collection, given to the LOC in 1955.)

geekstreats:

geekartgallery:

Brigands, Nerds and Dread Pirates" byAustin, Texas-based illustrator Chet Phillips Prints are available for purchase on his Etsy store. US$25

Awesome work 👌

geekstreats:

geekartgallery:

Van Gogh’s Paintings Get Tilt-Shifted by Serena Malyon

Serena Malyon, a 3rd-year student at art school, took some of van Gogh’s most beautiful paintings and altered them in Photoshop to achieved this amazing tilt-shift effect.

Fantastic

theoddmentemporium:

sangbleu:

Catherine the Great’s sexually charged furniture, read more on www.sangbleu.com

http://sangbleu.com/2013/10/16/catherine-the-great’s-erotic-cabinet/

I learnt about Catherine the Great at school. This gem, however, was rudely omitted from my education!

what-floats-my-boat:

Vintage luggage labels
ca 1920s-1950s
(via international poster)

fredhembeck:

Here’s a page scanned from one of my mid-nineties sketchbooks, doodled up during my sustained red Flair pentel period. And before you ask, no, no drugs were involved in the creation of this illo whatsoever—honest!….

fredhembeck:

Here’s a page scanned from one of my mid-nineties sketchbooks, doodled up during my sustained red Flair pentel period. And before you ask, no, no drugs were involved in the creation of this illo whatsoever—honest!….

victoriousvocabulary:

ALLÉGRESSE
[noun]
elation, joy, gladness.
Etymology: French, from Italian allegro “cheerful, gay,” from Latin alacrem (nominative alacer) “lively, cheerful, brisk”.
[Catrin Welz-Stein]

victoriousvocabulary:

ALLÉGRESSE

[noun]

elation, joy, gladness.

Etymology: French, from Italian allegro “cheerful, gay,” from Latin alacrem (nominative alacer) “lively, cheerful, brisk”.

[Catrin Welz-Stein]

browsethestacks:

Nicolas Cage Art Party: The Show So Bad It’s Good by Sam Laird

”…Centuries of human artistic expression — from cave paintings to Roman frescoes, from Rembrandt to Warhol — have led up to this. By “this” we mean the Nicolas Cage Art Party, a celebration of Cage-themed artwork — some of it quite well done — that will pay homage to the delightfully dreadful actor much of the Internet loves to hate when not hating itself for loving him…”

”…That’s right: A Cage-themed art show, believed to be the world’s first, is real and coming to San Francisco, Calif. Then it will mosey south for an encore in Los Angeles in July. More than a thousand people have already RSVP’d on Facebook to the San Francisco event, which starts at 7 p.m. on April 12 at a nightclub called Balançoire in the city’s trendy Mission District. Because, after all, doesn’t a man who’s capable of producing cinema like, well, this deserve such a fête?…”

”…The Nicolas Cage Art Party (alternately called the Nicolas Cage Art Show and Musical Shenanigans) is the brainchild of Ezra Croft. Croft is 35 years old, a Burning Man veteran, an avid cyclist and a Bay Area DJ who works at Bed Bath & Beyond to pay the bills. He was working an overnight shift at BB&B one night and looking at Reddit — where the One True God subreddit extolls the virtues of all things Cage — when the concept crept into his brain…”

”…”It didn’t start out as a joke,” Croft says, before adding with a laugh: “But it didn’t start out not as a joke, either.” After conceptualizing the idea and seeing it through, Croft began putting up calls for submissions on Craigslist boards all over the world. Submissions have since poured in from points across globe — France, Nigeria and Japan, for example…”

Via Mashable

vintagetoyarchive:

BRADLEY: 1960s MODERN FLAIR Stockinette Doll

vintagetoyarchive:

BRADLEY: 1960s MODERN FLAIR Stockinette Doll